Brampton Transit Will Pilot its Own Ridesharing Service

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Maybe we can think of this as Brampton Transit’s own version of UberPOOL?

According to Brampton Transit’s 2018-2022 business plan, Brampton Transit aims to pilot its own ridesharing service — or “dynamic transit” option — in 2019 or 2020, in just a few short years.

The goal is to create an on-demand, cost-effective service that doesn’t follow a fixed schedule like a bus, and services low-demand areas.

That’s right, when this pilot comes around, you’ll likely be able to use a mobile app to plan, book, track, and pay for your ride through Brampton Transit.

The details are currently in the works, such as whether Brampton Transit will outsource to a private company or use smaller transit vehicles.

There will be a more detailed study in 2018/2019 to work out the best next steps.

Here are the candidate areas for the pilot project, which would, again, roll out in 2019 or 2020, courtesy of Brampton Transit:

  • Service to low demand large industrial areas currently provided by Route 10 and/or Route 40 (to improve produc?vity).

  • Service to newly developing areas such as a poten?al service in northwest Brampton providing dynamic connec?ons to the Mount Pleasant GO Sta?on (as an opportunity to provide mobility early as the area con?nues to develop).

  • Supplement ?fixed route services to be ti?med to meet with GO Train arrivals/departures (e.g. Route 13 or Route 16 connec?ng the Bramalea Terminal with the Bramalea GO Sta?on).

  • As a measure to improve produc?vity during late evenings or on weekends (e.g. Routes that fall below minimum producti?vity levels during the evening periods and the area may be a candidate for dynamic services).

  • As a tool to improve integrati?on with Peel TransHelp (having Peel TransHelp provide integrated services in low demand areas or periods)

If any of this sounds familiar to a system that has already existed in Brampton…you’re right!

Have you ever heard of Bramalea Dial-A-Bus?

Well, it was like Bramalea’s own Uber system back in the 70s.

Basically, there was a service launched in 1973 in the Bramalea area with a base at Bramalea City Centre (BCC).

Residents would call a dispatcher to request a ride from their home, a bus would show up and passengers would pay a fare, and passengers could request to be let off anywhere in their “zone” (there were four zones) or stay on and go to BCC where they could transfer to another zone’s bus.

The service continued until Bramalea of Chinguacousy Township merged with Brampton in 1974, and eventually Dial-A-Bus services merged with Brampton Transit as local bus routes in 1976.

To an extent, you could say Dial-A-Bus is making a comeback!

What do you think of this concept?

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