Here's Why The High Graduation Rate In Peel Is Concerning: Report

 

The number of students graduating from high schools in the Peel District School Board is increasing.

The five-year board graduation rate is an important indicator of the success of secondary students and, more importantly, Peel schools.

The graduation rate is the ratio of the number of students who earned an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) to the number of students who were in the initial Grade 9 cohort. Specifically, the 2017-2018 board graduation rate is based on the percentage of students in the 2013-2014 Grade 9 cohort who successfully completed all the requirements for the OSSD and graduated from a Peel secondary school within five years.

In order to successfully complete all the requirements for the OSSD, a student must earn 30 credits (18 compulsory credits and 12 elective credits), pass the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test or Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course and complete 40 hours of volunteer work.

According to the Peel District School Board, the four-year graduation rate is 89 per cent, and the five-year graduation rate is 94 per cent. The graduation rate in Peel is higher than the overall graduation rate for Ontario. In Ontario, the four-year graduation rate is 79.8 per cent, and the five-year graduation rate is 86.3 per cent.

Even though the graduation rate in Peel is high, there are many disparities. 

Here is a breakdown of the graduation rate:

The Socioeconomic Vulnerability Index (SVI) is composed of five variables that profile the socioeconomic context of postal code areas where students live. Higher SVI scores indicate greater socioeconomic vulnerability.

The Peel District School Board also provided a breakdown of the graduation rate compared to the non-graduation rate. Over the past 10 years, there has been an increasing trend for students to graduate in four years instead of five years. For the 2004-2005 cohort, there was a 12 per cent difference between the four year and five-year graduation rates. For the 2013-2014 cohort, the difference decreased to 5 per cent. Here is a breakdown of those statistics: 

The board also released statistics as to why these students did not graduate. They found that more than nine out of 10 (95 per cent) of the non*graduates did not complete their 30 credits. However, 34 per cent of the non-graduates had 24.5 to 29 credits and the majority of these students needed only 1 to 3 credits complete their 30 credits.

Here is a breakdown of the other reasons why the students did not graduate: 

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